Data Viz of Guest blog posts

I am having a play around with Tableau Public for some work I am doing on the PASTEUR4OA Project. Tableau Public is free software that can allow anyone to connect to a spreadsheet or file and create interactive data visualizations for the web. It took me a while to get started (my operating systems on all my windows machines and macs weren’t up to date enough!) but now that I’m in I’m really getting the hang of it.

I can’t embed the javascript code here but you can go to my Tableau Public profile to see the interactive versions.

I started off with looking at how many guest posts had been submitted and in what month they tend to come in. You can see from the visualisation that March is a really popular month, followed by September and August.

Remote Worker Guest blog posts: What month do people submit in?

I then looked at how many guest blog posts are submitted by year. It looks like the number is on the decrease, see this visualisation.

Remote Worker Guest blog posts: Number by year

I finished by looking at the gender of my guest authors. The main trend there seems to be less male authors over time – not sure what I’m doing to drive them away! ;-) See this visualisation for details by year and this visualisation for totals (26 Females, 36 Males – 64 in total).

Remote Worker: Guest Authors by Gender and Year
Remote Worker: Guest Authors by Gender

I’ll continue to work on Tableau public for the project – hopefully my data visualisations will improve over time!

Applying for a remote job? Prepare to answer these interview questions

Monique RiversNot long ago we published a post on Hunting for Remote Working Jobs. In a very useful follow up Monique Rivers takes a look at the kind of questions a company might ask you in your interview for a remote position.

Monique is an Australian tech blogger who also loves good food and fashion. She works at ninefold.com. Ninefold is a company providing efficient and powerful virtual servers for all those occasions when a business needs to move their ideas into the cloud.

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Together with the rapid growth of communication technologies, we have witnessed remote work explode in popularity. If you still think working from home is a rare solution, just have a look at these statistics. Every field offers remote jobs that might fit your current preferences and lifestyle. How to make a good impression during an interview of a remote job? Here are top 5 questions you should prepare for when applying for this kind of professional opportunity.

What is your daily schedule?

Recruiters will want to see how well you know yourself: when you’re focused and what your top hours for productivity are. They’ll be interested whether you’re a morning bird or a night owl.

Remote jobs are often flexible and almost never tied town to the classic nine-to-five schedule – workers all over the world can work in shifts for one company. Recruiters will be interested in your strategies for organizing your work. You need to know your natural rhythm and analyse your daily schedule before you answer this question.

Which communication tools would you use in this situation?

Working in remote teams, you won’t have the chance of catching someone in between meetings for a quick chat. In order to be a productive member of the team, you’ll need solid knowledge on virtual communication and which methods are most efficient for your purposes.

Recruiters will be interested to see whether you’re well-versed in modern communication technologies like email, video hangouts, online chats or project management software. Moreover, they might give you a specific example and ask you to suggest which communication tool is the best one to use. It’s your turn to show that you know how to make remote projects proceed smoothly.

What are your requirements for a productive workspace?

Asking this question, recruiters are making sure that you’re aware of all the physical aspects of working remotely. They’ll also need this knowledge to see whether the company should provide you with specific equipment.

By Ali Edwards, Flickr, CC-BY

By Ali Edwards, Flickr, CC-BY

Whether you work from your kitchen counter or the couch, you’ll always need a few basics – a standing desk, high-quality scanner or even coworking office. Define your preferences and requirements – always mention them during the interview.

What tools do you use for managing your calendar/schedule?

Recruiters are really interested in this aspect – they might ask you questions about details, such as whether your calendar is open for everyone to see or what kind of events you post there. Organization is key in remote work, so recruiters will want to know what your tools for time management are and whether you’re familiar with crucial apps and platforms.

This also shows how much thought you put to organizing your work. It’s possible that joining the company, you’ll need to make a few changes, but the basic idea of organization needs to be there in the first place.

What is the organization system on your computer?

Recruiters will also want to know how you keep track of important files, notes and links on your computer. You’ll be sharing files with your coworkers and if they’re not properly named, you risk cluttering their workspace with things they cannot categorize at a glance.

Before you apply for a remote job, make sure to have an organization system in place: for storing files, managing issues like multiple tabs open in your browsers or keeping track of important links.

Working in remote has many perks, but it surely isn’t for everyone. When applying for a remote job, make sure that you have the required skills and actually like to work on your own. Remember that your professional history will be scrutinized as well – if your past positions involved a degree of autonomy, your chances at landing a remote job are much higher.

Zen me

I’ve kind of had a stressy time of late. Nothing serious but I have been in need of some Zen time. For my birthday some of my friends have decided that I need to chill out and I just wanted to share their lovely gifts! tea photo 4 My friend Kevin Mears also drew a fab picture of me being Zen! Now I just have to practice what I preach! ;-) OH7mnPhX.jpg_large

10 Apps that Help Create a Stress-Free Workday

Recently I’ve been reading up on Mindfulness. Mindfulness, according to Aleksandra Zgierska in 2009, is “accepting and non-judgemental focus of one’s attention on the emotions, thoughts and sensations occurring in the present moment“. It is a “mind-body approach to well-being that can help you change the way you think about experiences and reduce stress and anxiety” [Bemindful.co.uk]. I really like some of the core concepts, such as: focussing on the present, acceptance of the way things are, openness to new information, being fully present and beginner’s mind. I’m no expert yet but I’m going to keep reading and trying out…

sarahSarah Pike is interested in how we can de-stress our lives as remote workers and has written about 10 apps that help create a stress-free workday.

Sarah is a freelancer and college writing instructor. When she’s not writing or teaching, she’s probably binge-watching RomComs on Netflix or planning her next camping trip. She also enjoys following far too many celebrities than she should on Instagram. You can find Sarah on Twitter at @sarahzpike.

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Studies show people who work out of the office are more productive than their in-office peers. However, that doesn’t mean that working in your pajamas means you’re living a stress-free life. If you’re working from home and need a little help de-cluttering your mind, here are ten apps that can help reduce your workday stress.

  1. Asana

One of the biggest obstacles to working from home is finding ways to effectively communicate with the rest of your team. Asana helps to streamline the communication process by eliminating the need for email. The app allows you to organize tasks, create shared projects and add comments to each task your entire group can see.

  1. Stop, Breathe & Think

Meditation is a strong catalyst for helping your mind and body recover from a stressful day of work. Throwing a few minutes of it into your workday has shown to help lower your stress and make you more productive. The Stop, Breathe & Think app makes the mediation process personal by asking questions pertaining to your current state of mind and wellness, then mapping out meditation techniques to suit your situation.

  1. Simply Breathe

Mastering your breathing can help you reduce and even eliminate stress during the workday to help you relax. Download Simply Breathe to incorporate interactive games and sounds designed to help you focus your breathing. It also helps you set long-term goals, track your stress and share your progress with others to help motivate and inspire.

  1. Elevate

To perform better on the job at home, you need to train your brain. Apple named Elevate the best iPhone app of the year for 2014 because of its proven ability to help elevate your brainpower. The app uses 25 mini-games to improve your cognitive skills in memory, reading comprehension and focus. If you find yourself having trouble completing a task, take a break and hop on Elevate to re-orient your brain.

  1. Personal Zen

If you find yourself getting frustrated with your workload, download the Personal Zen app. A team of psychology professors created the app to help reduce anxiety and worry by reconditioning the way you think. It’s a simple design that forces you to follow around a happy face while ignoring an angry one. Researchers found playing it for 25 minutes can help you feel better throughout the day.

  1. Find Me Coffee

Maybe you need a change of scenery, or perhaps you’re just looking for an extra boost of energy to get you through the day. Either way, Find Me Coffee is a great resource for freelancers and coffee lovers. The app locates the nearest coffee shop and provides you with directions on how to get there. It’s the perfect way to break up the workday while getting you up and out of the house.

  1. Oh, Ranger! ParkFinder

Sometimes you just need to stretch your legs. The Oh, Ranger! ParkFinder app puts you in touch with nature by locating the nearest parks and outdoor recreation areas where you can take a walk. Studies have shown taking a walking break in the middle of the workday can help reduce stress while also making you more calm and alert.

  1. Spotify

Music has been shown to be capable of lowering blood pressure, slow our heart rates and decrease levels of stress hormones in our bodies. That’s why you should consider downloading the popular music app Spotify. The app allows you to put together your own playlists of your favorite artists for free, or you can buy the premium version to listen offline. Try searching for “deep focus” playlists for the moments when you really need to buckle down.

  1. MapMyFitness

It’s no secret that exercise and healthy eating make for better overall lifestyles, but did you know they could also help you be more productive at work? Regular exercise can help improve both alertness and energy levels. Apps like MapMyFitness are great because they can help plan exercise routes and provide you with a way to log your daily food intakes.

  1. Timeful

Working from home can blur the lines between everyday life and work, making it difficult to find a balance. Timeful is a time-management app that helps you find time for those small tasks you know need to be done, but never seem to quite fit into your schedule. It allows you to designate specific times for certain tasks throughout the day and helps you develop habits to keep yourself on track.

The best apps for remote workers are the ones that allow you to work from home while also maintaining a happy work-life balance. You might think playing on the Internet would lead to less productivity, but research shows access to the Internet actually helps increase overall happiness. Happier people make better workers, and these apps can surely help you de-stress and find a better balance between home and work.

Office Surfing

The Emporium of Dangerous Ideas aims to re-establish the importance of dangerous ideas as agents of change in education – to shift the axis of what is possible! It is for everyone who is passionate about education including college, university, school staff and students as well as those engaged in education throughout the creative communities.

Emporium-banner---blog4

They’ve recently shared a great idea for remote workers or office workers working in education.

A Dangerous Idea for creativity at work

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to work in a very different environment from your usual workplace? Would you like to try it out and become an office surfer? Would you like your organisation to Host an office surf? Would you like to meet people from other professions and sectors? What? … Spend some time in a different work environment, doing your work or work as a host, welcoming a surfer to experience your working environment.

Why? … Two reasons (among many!):

  1. To become more aware of the physical work environment, and the effect it has on your work. Does your workplace help you to be creative? How is the new environment different? What about it is helpful? Any ideas you could take back and implement in your own workplace?
  2. To meet new people and have interesting conversations. The random coffee scheme that was organised by Education Scotland has put hundreds of people together for interesting conversations, and ideas have grown out of it. Benefits?

As a Surfer you get:

  • the chance to see what working in a different environment feels like, and how it suits – or doesn’t – your work and your style
  • to benchmark your own work-space against the one you are visiting, and against best practice, and come away with ideas for improvement.
    As a Host you get:
  • feedback on your work environment from a fresh pairs of eyes, based on rigorous research rather than just personal preference
    You both get and interesting and unexpected connection.

The Emporium of Dangerous Ideas gets:

  • stories, photos and videos from surfers and hosts about their experiences
  • the assessment of what makes a creative environment
  • lots of great learning to share

Results of the office surf will be shown at the Emporium Finale in an exhibition of creative change. This will take place on Friday 19 June 2015 view programme and book online: http://events.collegedevelopmentnetwork.ac.uk/events/show/5200

If this sounds like a Dangerous Idea that you would like to be a part of, please contact Dawn Brooks for more information on how to take part.

Any responses should be in by Thursday 30 April 2015.

Views of Remote Working

Tarjei Vesaas, the Norwegian poet behind the Boat in the Evening once said “Almost nothing need be said when you have eyes.

The thing is when you work in a different place from your colleagues that seeing is gone. You don’t know what their space or their view is like, you can’t imagine how they work. There is no communal window, no shared perspective.

Mozilla recently published a post in which they showed images of their developer’s desk space. It was something I’d been meaning to do with Open Knowledge colleagues for a while.
desks

Today at our All-hands call people shared the view out of their window, or a place they’d recently been working in. I thought it might be interesting to pull these photos of desks and views together: no names, no comments, no explanation. If nothing else it shows what a diverse organisation we are. It also reminds us that when you work with someone, and your only contact is through wires, it makes sense to remember that they might see things differently from you.

windowview

Remote working from an organisational perspective

BenIn the past numerous articles on the blog have touched on the benefits of remote working and how employees can prosper from carrying out work related activities from the comfort of their own home. However we haven’t had many articles that focus on what remote working means from an organisational perspective. This article by CEO Benjamin Fountain does just that.

Benjamin is CEO at London’s exciting new web development company Zed Zed. Their new ground breaking concept is based entirely on people working from home. Zed Zed has recruited a specialist workforce who are looking for a fresh approach to working life and those who are tired of the typical 9-5 office based roles. Zed Zed believes that this is the future of recruitment and by embracing what people want the company aims to produce a highly effective team.

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I’m passionate about Startups. I have been managing a web development company for over 10 years and our work is centred around the start up field making innovative and exciting online applications.

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During the past year we have been working as a team to develop the new age of web development and online application deployment. At the start of this year we launched ZZ.co.uk and the response has been incredible.

ZZ.co.uk is a new startup which will bring remote working contractors together under one brand to offer companies around the world, international deployment, 24/7 development and the ultimate in tech team customisation.’

So.. Why does Zed Zed recruit in this way?

Having worked in an office throughout almost all of my professional life I found it extremely tiring and demanding having to repeat the same routine on a daily basis. Although working in an office has many positive aspects including the chance to interact with colleagues there are also negative effects which include the following…

  • A recent study outlined how the average person in Britain spends 54 minutes a day commuting and ‘feelings of happiness, life satisfaction and the sense that one’s activities are worthwhile all decrease with every successive minute of travel to work’. In addition, commuting can lead to high levels of stress as a result of delays, unpredictable weather and of course a lack of control. This is clearly a cause for concern as stress within the workplace can lead to a lack of productivity but more worryingly it could potentially result in both mental and physical issues for employees.
  • Carrying out mundane, routinized activities on a frequent basis coupled with the highly stressful nature of the role can be tough. For example, sitting at your office table for 8 hours a day could be highly frustrating and potentially demotivating because as people we are keen to experience new things on a regular basis.

At Zed Zed we strongly believe that our team should be treated as people rather than entities which is why we encourage them to choose their own hours and days of work. We believe that remote employment can help increase productivity amongst team members as well as help stimulate their minds. In addition we understand that commuting to work can be difficult for many people and remote employment sidesteps this issue completely which enables ZZ Team Members to spend more time with their families. We feel that this flexibility helps the team to remain stress free whilst effectively carrying out their responsibilities.

We appreciate the fact that our team have lives beyond that of the workplace and we look to accommodate this at all times by giving them freedom and encouraging them to enjoy their work rather than have the feeling that work is almost like a ‘chore’ that they have to do. Our business model enables them to work for the company part-time so that they can also work with us even with their full-time job. This can have a significant impact on their earnings whilst at the same time giving them a chance to try a new career.

Ultimately, Zed Zed believes in the responsibility of adults and of the incredible talent available who can’t necessarily commute to a job. We believe people should not live to work but that work should be an enjoyable part of their life which they can’t live without. We recruit team members who have a passion for life and their work which gives us a strong and dedicated team.