Still Making Remote Work Work

I need to start with an apology.

I’ve been neglecting this blog of late. My excuse is that I have been a bit too busy working to think about the way in which I work. I guess it’s a common problem. Being busy often means that we carry on doing what we know rather than switching to a new and potentially better way of working. Sometimes I feel like I’m all out of ideas too. That’s no good.

Anyway a colleague shared this great post with me yesterday. It’s called Making Remote Work Work (nice title – feeling a little jealous I didn’t come up with that one – so have stolen it in homage!) and is by Christopher Groskopf from Source. He shares some great tips on how to work effectively from far away. Some of them ‘’m doing already and have never put down on paper, others are actually new ideas – and I’ve felt a little inspired.

I mean look at this one:

Pro tip: if you’ve got school-age kids, schedule yourself for the half-hour they get out of school for the next ten years. In practice nobody will even notice you’ve done this and it will save you the hassle of having to reschedule a meeting because you have to pick your kids up.

I’ve recently started doing this and it makes complete sense. I can be pretty flexible time-wise but 3- 3:30 is a no go area for me, I just can’t do calls or anything, so I may as well be upfront about it.

He also suggests getting a multi-timezone clock. This is such a good idea, I use apps galore but time-zones are like a black hole for me. A clock would be brilliant – it’s on my birthday list.

timezone

Curioso elemento el tiempo by leoplus, Flickr

Anyway it’s a post definitely worth reading! If only I had the time to write one as good ;-)

In other news apparently “Commuting makes you ‘unhappy and anxious’” – unsurprising really, but now there is data to back it up. This recent article in the Guardian reports on a study on the wellbeing of workers led by the Office for National Statistics. The research was based on data from the Annual Population Survey in which people were asked where they worked, how long they travelled for, how satisfied they were with their life.

The research found that when compared with those who worked from home, commuters were less satisfied and happy, and when compared with each other, for each extra minute they travelled commuters became less satisfied.

So I’m still happy working remotely, and I’m still trying to make it work, just sometimes I’m too busy to report back.

Hangs head in shame!!

About these ads

2 thoughts on “Still Making Remote Work Work

  1. Do we really need a study to tell us commuting is hell on Earth?! For me, a key factor in considering if I should take a new job is can I cycle or walk to work? More employers should support remote working for at least a part of the week, you get happier, more productive employees. Also, I believe it can help with recruiting and retaining staff. I wonder if there is any evidence for that…

    Anyhow, if you think this site is neglected, check out mine, http://scruffian.net, it’s shameful!

  2. Thanks Peter. I agree that it’s not rocket science. 2 hours a day not spent in a car or crowded train = 2 hours that can be spent with the family or working effectively from home. If you split it that’s 5 hours a week that the employer and the employee each gain a week – win win.

    Yet organisations still don’t seem to get it…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s